Warriors deal PG Charles Jenkins, F Jeremy Tyler

Steinmetz: Trades all about escaping luxury tax

Warriors deal PG Charles Jenkins, F Jeremy Tyler
February 21, 2013, 1:00 pm
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The Golden State Warriors have agreed to deals to send forward Jeremy Tyler and guard Charles Jenkins to Atlanta and Philadelphia, respectively, along with cash considerations.

Golden State needed to shave approximately $1.2 million from its cap figure to prevent paying the luxury tax. In ridding itself of Tyler and Jenkins, the team will save about $1.5 million. In exchange, the Warriors will receive a reported pair of second-round picks in the 2013 draft, but general manager Bob Myers elected not to discuss the terms of the picks.

“We were not under a mandate to get under the tax,” Myers said. “The only mandate that I’m operating under, and our group is operating under, is to win. We made this decision more for basketball reasons than economic reasons.”

By staying under the tax, the Warriors will not be subjected to classification as a repeater next year.

“Every year you’re in the tax you risk being called a repeater,” Myers said. “We’re possibly going to be a tax-paying team next year with the roster we have and wanting to improve the team.”

The moves leave about $294,000 for the team to spend on a player for the rest of the season. A potential free agent signed to a pro-rated minimum would allow the team to stay below luxury tax.

“We wanted the flexibility to have the opportunity to add a player in the next week or two – which we can do – that’ll help the team and not go back into the tax,” Myers said.  “There are a lot of players out there now and maybe come available if bought out that we hope we can look at – and if one makes sense, we can add them.”

Myers was the one who informed both players they would be headed elsewhere.

“It’s a hard thing to do. There’s a human element to what we do. It’s not all business and it’s not all numbers,” he said. “There are people you’re dealing with and it’s emotional, I’ll tell you that. To sit across from good kids that have given you a lot and have helped be apart the changes we’ve made culturally.”

Jenkins, a second-round pick by Golden State in the 2011 NBA Draft (44th overall), has appeared in 47 games this season. He’s averaging 1.7 points, 0.4 rebounds and 0.6 assists in 6.2 minutes per game.

Tyler appeared in 20 games, averaging 3.1 minutes and 1.1 points per game. He has been assigned to the Santa Cruz Warriors of the D-League five times, where he averaged 15.0 points, 8.0 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 30 minutes per game.

Both players figure to benefit from the moves in terms of playing time.

Warriors guard and 2011 draft classmate Klay Thompson said it was a tough day.

"For everybody it’s tough if you get traded, but you can almost look at it like an opportunity and at the end of the day, you’re still playing basketball for a living so it’s not that bad at all,” he said. “Whoever it might be that gets traded it’s tough losing a friend, it’s really tough, but you still keep relationships with them throughout your career so it’s not the end of the world. It’s not a fun day."

Coach Mark Jackson and Jenkins both reacted to the deals on Twitter.

 Jackson:

 Jenkins:

 

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